Ibori: British Media Demand Details Of Police Corruption | Independent Newspapers Limited
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Ibori: British Media Demand Details Of Police Corruption

Ibori's Return Will Bring Urhobo Back To Political Limelight - UYE
Posted: Oct 12, 2016 at 4:10 am   /   by   /   comments (0)



The British media have demanded details of the alleged police corruption in the trial and conviction of Chief James Onanefe Ibori, the former Delta State governor.

At last Friday’s hearing of the case, journalists who were at the Southwark London courtroom expressed disappointment over the non-disclosure of the incriminating material demonstrating police corruption and prosecutorial misconduct.

The journalists had come in droves because some 5,000 pages of papers documenting police violations, infringements, deliberate lies and outright malfeasance were promised to be on display as they would be handed over to the court.

The non-disclosure, Independent learnt, was as a result of the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) issuing a gagging order on the defence teams from disclosing the incriminating materials.

This made the media, as represented by Mr. David Rose of the Mail on Sunday, to make a representation directly to the judge for the dissemination of the material disclosed by the National Crime Agency, which carried out the internal review of the police actions and uncovered the massive police misconduct.

Mr. Rose argued in court that “the public has a right to know of the degree and depth of the police corruption in the case”.  But the Judge declined the request, saying that “the matter has now been referred to the Court of Appeal and therefore any application should be made at that court”.

In a statement Tuesday, Tony Eluemunor, Ibori’s Media Assistant, said the development is a telling sign that the case has changed against those prosecuting the former governor.

“This is the most telling sign that the case has changed, and the erstwhile hunters, the police and the prosecution, have turned the hunted as they are defending themselves from charges of corruption and criminal misleading of the court in a bid to secure conviction against Chief James Onanefe Ibori and his associates,” the statement reads.

This week’s London Mail specifically provided glaring details of that court session. Its lengthy title was telling and it reads: “How top QC ‘buried evidence of Met bribes to put innocent man in jail’: Whistleblower alerted court that ‘organised crime’ had infiltrated police… then they said he had perverted course of justice.”

Right from its opening sentence, the report showed how far and how much the Ibori case has changed: “One of the country’s top prosecutors, Ms Sasha Wass (Queen’s Counsel, QC, British equivalent of Senior Advocate of Nigeria) is facing professional ruin following sensational claims in a London courtroom that she lied to judges in order to hide damning evidence of police corruption – at the risk of sending an innocent man to jail.

“At the heart of the growing scandal, is Sasha Wass QC, the barrister who prosecuted entertainer Rolf Harris and the £2 billion rogue trader Kweku Adoboli.

Claims were that Ms Wass not only buried an official report by the Metropolitan Police confirming there was evidence that officers in its anti-corruption unit had taken bribes, but that she prosecuted the lawyer who brought the report to the attention of the authorities for perverting the course of justice.

“The alleged attempted cover-up almost led to a lengthy prison sentence for the man who blew the whistle, Bhadresh Gohil.

“In a sensational volte-face, a CPS spokesman on Friday admitted it is now clear that, contrary to repeated statements by Crown lawyers in court and in legal documents, there is ‘material to support the assertion that a police officer received payment in return for information’.

“Mr Gohil’s lawyer, Stephen Kamlish QC, equally stated in court on Friday that when Mr Gohil was charged, the police, the prosecuting barristers and the CPS all had possession of the file containing the evidence of the Met’s infiltration by RISC. Furthermore, Director of Public Prosecutions Alison Saunders authorised the prosecution of Mr Gohil, and continued to oversee the case until it was dropped 18 months later. Mr Gohil has now been paid £20,000 in an out-of-court settlement.

“Legal experts said yesterday that for one QC to make allegations of this kind against colleagues was probably unprecedented. But Mr Kamlish said: ‘Everything I said in court is fully supported by the evidence supplied by the prosecution and is in accordance with my professional duties and responsibilities.’

“Friday’s hearing at Southwark Crown Court concerned the Crown’s attempt to confiscate Chief Ibori’s property. But the legal battle is set to move to the Court of Appeal, where Mr Gohil has applied to reopen his money-laundering case. It is likely Ibori and the other defendants will also mount fresh appeals.

“The prosecution sought to impose a cut-off point for the submission of all appeals. The court agreed on the date of 3 February next year, for the next hearing by which all parties who were intending to lodge appeal should have done so.

“The court saw some of the evidence demonstrating the degree and depth of corruption. These were displayed on the court screens. For example, one document showed how the Court of Appeal in the Gohil case was misled by the CPS/Wass /Weissman and Williams doctoring the document and removing very key phrases demonstrating the corruption in the original case. The Court of Appeal was therefore told there was nothing to disclose. It was deliberately misled,” Eluemunor stated.